Feline ocular post-traumatic sarcomas

Fonte: Carrissa Wood and Erin M Scott

Clinical images of cats with feline ocular post-traumatic sarcomas (FOPTS). (a) A complete cataract with posterior synechiae is causing an abnormal pupil shape (dyscoria). Note the vascular proliferation of neoplastic tissue on the surface of the iris and lens. The majority of the tumor was located in the posterior segment of the eye. (b) A tan/white colored vascular mass is filling the globe and extending through the sclera near the limbus.
   Clinical images of cats with feline ocular post-traumatic sarcomas (FOPTS). (a) A complete cataract with posterior synechiae is causing an abnormal pupil shape (dyscoria). Note the vascular proliferation of neoplastic tissue on the surface of the iris and lens. The majority of the tumor was located in the posterior segment of the eye. (b) A tan/white colored vascular mass is filling the globe and extending through the sclera near the limbus.

Practical relevance: Ocular tumors in cats are seen uncommonly in general practice. Feline ocular post-traumatic sarcomas (FOPTS) represent a very aggressive type of ocular cancer that occurs in cats with a prior history of trauma or severe intraocular disease. Treatment options are limited and early recognition is imperative for close monitoring of disease progression and prompt enucleation. Clinical challenges: There is often a delay between the initiating ocular trauma and tumor formation, with an average latency of approximately 6–7 years. Therefore, many cases may not be presented with a documented history of a traumatic incident, especially if the event occurred prior to adoption. While a histologic diagnosis is easy to obtain with enucleation, the aggressive and locally invasive behavior of FOPTS may prevent complete surgical resection. Global importance: Cats are the most popular pet in the USA and Western Europe. As there is no breed predisposition for this particular cancer, and males are only slightly over-represented compared with females, a relatively large population of companion animals is at potential risk of developing FOPTS. Audience: While uncommon, the understanding and recognition of this tumor type by general practitioners is important for the feline patient. This allows for close monitoring of cats known to have undergone serious ocular trauma, and prompt referral or early enucleation, as well as client education. Patient group: The typical patient is a middle-aged to older cat with a history of mechanical trauma to the eye, past intraocular surgery or chronic uveitis. Evidence base: Historically, there has been limited clinical evidence upon which to determine the optimal treatment for FOPTS, beyond enucleation of the affected eye. Recommendations are generally based on limited case reports and clinical experience of the practitioner.

 

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